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Interview with the Playwright

Click HERE to read a long-form interview with Hookman playwright Lauren Yee. Here’s an excerpt with my favorite bit:

IMB: Given that you don’t love horror movies, and you shy away from scary, shocking genres, what made you want to dive headfirst into a play that demands massive amounts of stage blood, and violence, and suspenseful discomfort?

LY: I think I felt like there’s room out there in the horror genre for something that is scary, but is also awkward; that there’s more than one way to look at death, and see the different facets of it. Also, as someone who doesn’t like scary movies, it was a way to deflate the genre for myself. If I could take horror, and make it kind of awkward and goofy and uncomfortable, that might be kind of fun for me. There could be a horror story that I could sit through.

IMB: Did you watch any horror movies in preparation for this?

LY: [long pause] Not really. I thought back to all the trailers of horror movies that I watched, and got terrified by. I know some of the stories but…

IMB: …The trailer is enough.

LY: Yes. The trailer is enough. I admit it. I did not watch a lot of movies to prepare for this.

IMB: Do you remember ever having watched one all the way through?

LY: I watched The Ring. All the way through. One of my friends was a big, big Japanese horror fan, and it terrified me. I went home and – the premise behind The Ring is that you watch this kind of grainy videotape – and I turned on my TV, and it was like the grainy videotape quality, and I turned it off. I couldn’t – yeah.

IMB: Did it follow you around? Like, when you see these things, do you carry that discomfort with you for a while after you see it?

LY: I think so. I think you begin to see the ways in which your normal every day life begins to warp to accommodate these horror images.

IMB: That feels so connected to this play, that idea of being so uncomfortable about something that –

LY: – That your mind begins to change things right in front of you. Or, that you begin to see more into silences, or objects, than you should.

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About ilanaturgy

Ilana Brownstein is a dramaturg and director specializing in new play development, based in Boston. She is the Founding Dramaturg at Playwrights' Commons and the Director of New Work at Company One.

One response to “Interview with the Playwright

  1. Pingback: Interview with Indie Producer Nikki Wall « Women Who Produce

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