Throat Slit Effect

This video is for Nikki, so she can see what getting her throat slit looks like from the audience’s point of view. We aren’t using this special effect technique, so it won’t look exactly like this in performance, but it should give a good general idea. Also, since Nikki pretty much can’t stand horror movies, this is a nice, non-scary way to check it all out. The whole video is pretty interesting, but if you just want to see the effect in action, skip ahead to minute 8.

 

For a slit throat in action, see this clip from Scream, starting at about 2:40…

 

Interview with the Playwright

Click HERE to read a long-form interview with Hookman playwright Lauren Yee. Here’s an excerpt with my favorite bit:

IMB: Given that you don’t love horror movies, and you shy away from scary, shocking genres, what made you want to dive headfirst into a play that demands massive amounts of stage blood, and violence, and suspenseful discomfort?

LY: I think I felt like there’s room out there in the horror genre for something that is scary, but is also awkward; that there’s more than one way to look at death, and see the different facets of it. Also, as someone who doesn’t like scary movies, it was a way to deflate the genre for myself. If I could take horror, and make it kind of awkward and goofy and uncomfortable, that might be kind of fun for me. There could be a horror story that I could sit through.

IMB: Did you watch any horror movies in preparation for this?

LY: [long pause] Not really. I thought back to all the trailers of horror movies that I watched, and got terrified by. I know some of the stories but…

IMB: …The trailer is enough.

LY: Yes. The trailer is enough. I admit it. I did not watch a lot of movies to prepare for this.

IMB: Do you remember ever having watched one all the way through?

LY: I watched The Ring. All the way through. One of my friends was a big, big Japanese horror fan, and it terrified me. I went home and – the premise behind The Ring is that you watch this kind of grainy videotape – and I turned on my TV, and it was like the grainy videotape quality, and I turned it off. I couldn’t – yeah.

IMB: Did it follow you around? Like, when you see these things, do you carry that discomfort with you for a while after you see it?

LY: I think so. I think you begin to see the ways in which your normal every day life begins to warp to accommodate these horror images.

IMB: That feels so connected to this play, that idea of being so uncomfortable about something that –

LY: – That your mind begins to change things right in front of you. Or, that you begin to see more into silences, or objects, than you should.

Let’s watch some trailers!

For past blog posts on horror movies, choose “horror” from the tag cloud at the bottom of this page.

Greg & Ilana recommend:

SCREAM

• Scream • Scream 2 • Scream 3 • Scream 4

 

 

URBAN LEGEND

 

• Urban Legend (which awesomely features Robert Englund, best known as the actor who plays Freddy in the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise) • Urban Legends: Final Cut • Urban Legends: Bloody Mary

 

 

I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER (Featuring a guy with a hook!)

I Know What You Did Last Summer • I Still Know What You Did Last Summer • I’ll Always Know What You Did Last Summer

 

 

Lauren recommends some scarier movies:

FINAL DESTINATION

• Final Destination 1 • Final Destination 2 • Final Destination 3 • Final Destination 4 • Final Destination 5

 

 

 

 

HALLOWEEN

• Halloween (1978 version) • Halloween II • Halloween III: Season of the Witch • Halloween IV: The Return of Michael Myers • Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers • Halloween 6: The Curse of Michael Myers • Halloween H20: 20 Years Later • Halloween: Resurrection • Halloween (Rob Zombie’s 2007 version) • H2 (Rob Zombie’s 2009 sequel)

Girls Rescue People

“JESS: Why is it a guy who rescues her? Girls rescue people”

Thank you, Wikipedia, for a concise explanation of the FINAL GIRL horror film trope:

The final girl is a trope in thriller and horror films (particularly slasher films) that specifically refers to the last woman or girl alive to confront the killer, ostensibly the one left to tell the story. The final girl has been observed in dozens of films, including Halloween[1]Friday the 13thA Nightmare on Elm StreetScreamFinal DestinationThe Texas Chain Saw Massacre and its remakeI Know What You Did Last SummerHellraiserAlienThe StrangersThe RingThe Grudge, and Terror Train. The term was coined[2] by Carol J. Clover in her 1992 book Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film. Clover suggests that in these films, the viewer begins by sharing the perspective of the killer, but experiences a shift in identification to the final girl partway through the film. …The final girl is the “investigating consciousness” of the film, moving the narrative forward and as such, she exhibits intelligence, curiosity, and vigilance.

Here’s a nice list of the Top 10 Final Girls from horror films.

Rules for Surviving a Horror Movie

Some uberfan has constructed a useful list of rules for surviving a horror movie (should you find yourself inside one). There’s several dozen, here are some of my favorites…
  • If you’re searching for something that caused a mysterious noise and find out that it’s just the cat, leave the room immediately if you value your life.
  • If you’re running from the monster, expect to trip or fall down at least twice, more if you are of the female persuasion. Also note that, despite the fact that you are running and the monster is merely shambling along, it’s still moving fast enough to catch up with you.
  • When you’re searching a house because you think there’s something dangerous there, for God’s sake turn the lights on!
  • Never back out of one room into another without looking. It’s always behind you.
  • Never, ever, ever turn off the paved road onto a gravel or dirt road.
  • Always make sure that your car has a fresh battery and a full tank of gas so it will start immediately in times of crisis.
  • Never say that you’ll be right back, because you won’t.
  • When you have the benefit of numbers, NEVER pair off or go it alone.
  • Beware of strangers bearing tools such as chain saws, staple guns, hedge trimmers, electric carving knives, combines, lawn mowers, butane torches, band saws, or any device made from deceased companions.
  • Always check the back seat of your car.
  • Listen closely to the sound track and pay attention to the audience, since they are usually far more intelligent than you could ever hope to be.
  • And the #1 rule for surviving a horror movie:
    • DON’T HAVE SEX!!!